Jan 27, 2009

Extraordinary houses | Bizarre Feats of Architecture

Most Bizarre Houses around the world
The Spaceship House, in Chattanooga (TN, USA).

Most Bizarre Houses around the world

The Teapot Dome, in Zillah (WA, USA). It was built in 1922 as a reminder of the Teapot Dome Scandal involving President Warren G. Harding and a federal petroleum reserve in Wyoming.

The Boeing 727 House, in Benoit (Mississippi, USA). The plane set Joanne Ussary back $2,000.00, cost $4,000.00 to move, and $24,000.00 to renovate. The stairs open with a garage door remote, and one of the bathrooms is still intact. And let’s not forget the personal jacuzzi in the cockpit.

The Toilet-shaped house, in Suwon (South Korea). South Korean sanitation activists marked the start of a global toilet association right here on November 21, 2007, by lifting the lid on the world's first lavatory-shaped home that offers plenty of water closet space.

The Nautilus House, in Mexico DF (Mexico), is a seashell-inspired abode built by designed by Senosiain Arquitectos for a couple.

The Shoe House in Hellam (Pennsylvania, USA). It was an actual guesthouse (3 bedroom, 2 baths, a kitchen and a living room) of a local shoe magnate, Mahlon N. Haines. After his death, it was an ice cream parlor for a while, and now it is a museum.

The Upside-Down House, in Szymbark (Poland). The house was created by Daniel Czapiewski to describe the former communist era and the present times in which we live.

The Cube houses, in Rotterdam (Holland). All of this 32 cube houses are attached to each other. Designed by architect Piet Blom in 1984, each cube house has three floors.

The Bubble House in Cannes (France). In the early eighties, fashion designer Pierre Cardin bought this atypical summer house built by architect Antti Lovag.

The Eliphante Art House, in Cornville (AZ, USA). Artist Michael Kahn and his wife Leda Livant built it from found materials piece by piece.

The Mushroom House, in Cincinnati (Ohio, USA).

The One Log House, in Garberville (California, USA). It is a one-bedroom house hollowed out from a single log that came from a 2,100-year old redwood tree. After felling this 13 foot diameter forest giant, Art Schmock and a helper needed 8 months of hard labor to hollow out the log into a room 7 ft. high and 32 ft. long, weighing about 42 tons.

The Fallingwater, in Pennsylvania (USA). It was designed by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1935 and built partly over a waterfall.

The Steel House, in Lubbock (Texas, USA). Architect and sculptor Robert Bruno spent 23 years building this strange home that looks like a giant pig out of 110 tons of steel.

The Pickle Barrel House, in Michigan (USA).

The Strawberry house, in Tokyo (Japan).

The Errante's Guest House, in Chile.

The Kettle House, in Texas (USA).

The Kvivik Igloo, in Kvivik (Faroe Islands).

The Walking House, a 10ft high home that's solar and wind powered and can stroll at walking pace across all terrains. Made by the MIT and a bunch of danish artists.


Josie on 5:11 AM said...

neat...I would consider living in The Fallingwater house

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